STOP Animation Last Day!

April 1, 2014 § Leave a comment

Today you will film your stop animation using MyCreate on our class iPads. 

 

If you are using iMovie, here is the direction (in Word Doc).

 

Here is some advice about taking pictures for stop animation.

1. Name your project with your names. (e.g., EubaeShawnQuha: FamilyCrisis)

2. Take pictures in one sitting to control the light.

3. It helps if you have a background frame – Black felt papers work well because it absorbs light instead of reflecting it.

4. Move objects subtly and take pictures for each tiny move.

5. Take a few test shots and see how they look when put together.

6. Take at least 200 pictures. The Amazon Kindle commercial had 6-8 pictures per second. For one minute video, you will need at 360-480 pictures. Take lots.

7. Add background music or narration.  (Need free music?

8. Add credits.

9. Upload to YouTube.

10. Share on our Facebook Group: EDIT2000 Exhibition.

 

You should be done with the iPad today. You cannot take it outside the class.

Stop Animation is due by the end of the class today. Guess what we will be doing on Thursday?

 

For NEXT CLASS

We will spend some time thinking about your 20% product and presentation.

We begin Critical Thinking and Problem Solving.
 

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Stop Animation Day 2

March 27, 2014 § Leave a comment

Today we are simply working on props for your stop animation video.

 

Things to remember today:

What message is your video conveying? Is it clear to the viewer? How can you make it more clear?
Does your video tell a story? Are you sure? Who is the main character? What is the plot?

It might be a good idea to get your hands on iCreate on the iPad. Be sure to check the number of your iPad and DO NOT delete any one’s projects.

Please make sure that you come to class on next Tuesday ready to take pictures of your props. The goal for Tuesday’s class is to finish capturing and turning it into an animation –  that means you need to come to class ready to begin shooting. You shouldn’t be working on scripts or props Tuesday morning.

 

FOR NEXT TUESDAY:

1. Make sure you have all of the props and materials you need to create your video.

2. How many pictures are you planning to take? Less than 200? Yikes! You really should take more.

Creativity and Innovation: Stop Animation Day One

March 25, 2014 § Leave a comment

WHAT ARE THE TRAITS OF CREATIVE PEOPLE?

We have discussed traits of creative people, quality and quantity of creativity, and how to foster creativity in school.

Some traits of creative people can be considered weird behavior.  As a teacher, do you think that you can tell who are creative kids in your class?  Do you think that you are prepared to help those creative kids?  Let’s watch this video of a creative girl.

Creativity Cases

Which options did you choose to do for creativity cases? What questions do you have about creativity cases?

Each of the 2 cases you choose must be accompanied by written documentation (3-4 paragraphs, 200 words) that relates your project to the assigned readings (maker spaces, creativity definitions, Grow Creativity article.)  Review each case description for details of what should be included.

LINK: Details of creativity cases are found here. 

Make Creativity Cases page on your portfolio. Add a description of each case you are doing and add a link to your product along with written documentation.

Creativity Cases are  Due Thursday, April 3 at the beginning of class.

 

Stop Animation

Today we begin our MakerSpace project: Stop Animation.

For the next 3 days of class, we’ll be working in groups to create stop animation videos.

 

For the next 3-4 days of class we’ll be working in groups to create Stop animation videos.  Watch one from a previous semester on the water cycle.  Let’s watch another one on the solar system. Now, read more about Slowmation videos here.

 

What is stop animation? Stop animation, simply put, is just an animation technique.  You move the objects little by little and take pictures of each move and then you edit all the pictures by using some software.  Let’s take a look at a few examples.  (I know they are made by professionals.  We are not expected to be that good, but no sloppy work please.)

Amazon Kindle Commercial

XBox Commercial

Do you really want to watch student examples? I would you rather not.  I don’t want you to settle on the minimum requirement. I want you to go above and beyond and do something extraordinary.

If you must, here is a couple from a previous semester:

  • The Evolution of Gaming

on the  water cycle and  solar system.

Now, read more about Slowmation videos here.

To create the stop animation infomercial, you need to at least do the following things.

  • Find good partners– creative, responsible, similar schedule, easy to meet with…(this project will take a lot of time and effort…so I will suggest that you work with at least one partner).
  • Plan: What are you going to make? What is the message you want to convey through your stop animation?
  • Think about the materials–  what kind of materials you need to make this stop animation
  • Make the background and props.
  • Take pictures with iCreate and turn your photos to a movie.
  • Add sound, background music…etc.
  • DONE!

Q&A

  • How many people can be in a group?
    Since this project requires your creativity, effort and time, get into a group no more than 3.
  • How long should this stop animaiton be?
    Usually, it’s about one or two minutes.  A few students made longer ones before.
  • How many pictures do we need?
    You may need only 200 pictures, or maybe 300.  One group set up the record for about 1400 pictures last semester.  TAKE MORE THAN YOU NEED!  The more images you have, the more smooth the film will be!
  • Do I really need background music?
    It is not required, but music adds great value.

 

TODAY: Getting Started on Your Video:

1. Gather a group of 2 or 3 classmates.
2. Come up with an idea for your video (make sure it matches a Georgia Performance Standard) The best topics are ones that show cycles, systems, formulas, strategies, processes, etc.
3. Plan your story: What message is your video conveying? Who is the main character? What is the plot?
4. Decide what props and equipment you’ll need. You can be the prop like the Amazon Kindle commercial.
5. Start writing your script.

For the next 2 days:

Stop Animation Day 2 (March 27th): On Thursday, you’ll have the entire class to make your props and organize whatever is needed for filming. You may start filming with iCreate.  Remember which iPad you used (There is a number on the iPad and the protection cover.)

Stop Animation Day 3 (April 1st): On our third day,  you’ll have the entire class time available for filming your project.  You’ll need to come to class ready to film – with props ready to go. You’ll need to take 200 or more still images to make a decent length slowmation video iCreate makes it very easy to create stop animations. You should finish filming your project.

Be sure not to delete anyone’s projects.  If your team has already finished the project, you may leave early or work on your creativity cases.

 

FOR OUR NEXT CLASS:

1.Read Shively, C.H., (2011). Grow Creativity. Learning & Leading with Technology. 38 (7), pp. 10-15.  You can access the reading here. The article is in the Learning and Leading May 2011 issue.

2. Come to class ready to start building your props: clay figures, construction paper, models, scissors, colored pencils, other art supplies

3. Be sure to work on your cases. You will want to get a good start on at least one project and its documentation before you return to next class.

 

How to Measure Creativity

March 20, 2014 § Leave a comment

 How do you measure creativity?

We will have a guest speaker, Ms. Suehyeon Paek. Ms. Paek is a doctoral student in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Georgia.  Her areas of specialization is Gifted and Creativity Education. She has conducted research on creativity, divergent thinking, and problem finding. She has assisted the Torrance Test of Creativity Thinking (TTCT) scoring certificate program and the Duke University’s Talent Identification Program (TIP) gifted education program for K-12.

She will talk about how to measure creativity and motivate students to be creative.

 

Guest Lecturer Evaluation Form

Please submit your  evaluation for How to Measure Creativity.

 

Flipgrid video response

After listening to her talk, you will create a video response on her talk. Ms. Paek’s talk would be critical for you to prepare your responses. You can choose one question from the following questions. Record your video responses on Flipgrid.

  1. Why is it important to measure creativity? Or is it not?  Answer this question on flipgrid
  2. What are some ways to foster creativity in students who are not motivated at school? Answer this question on flipgrid
  3. What are some strategies for teachers to foster creativity in themselves? Answer this question on flipgrid

Here is how to record a video response on Flipgrid.

1. You do not need to sign in.

2. Click on the question box that you chose to respond.

3. Click on the big green + button to begin.

4. Snap a thumbnail photo using your web cam. (There are multiple filter options to have a little fun and get aligned with the webcam).

5. Record your video response (up to 90 seconds).

6. If you didn’t get it right at the first time, you can record as many times as you need, and submit your video.

 

This is due by Monday, March 24, 11:59 pm EDT. Embed your video to your portfolio named “Creativity and Innovation.

 

For Tuesday:

Creativity and Innovation: Creativity Cases

March 18, 2014 § Leave a comment

Housekeeping

20% Project Expectations and Rubric

We generated a rubric to evaluate the 20% project in the areas of blog posting, product, and presentation. Please click here to access the rubric.

Creative Spring Break

What creative things did you do during spring break? Any innovative and original inventions you created? Any adventures that took you to try creative things?

HOW DO RESEARCHERS THINK ABOUT CREATIVITY?

Sir Ken Robinson, a creativity expert from England, actually delivered a powerful talk in 2006 and indicated that schools kill creativity.  Let’s take a look at part of this video to see why he thinks that the school is killing creativity (1:40-3:50, 8:30-13:20).

Four years later, he was invited to give another TED talk about creativity.  He has some great ideas that is very helpful for educators. I highly recommend you listen to his talk. If you only have a few minutes, be sure to watch 3:20 -16:30.

Do you agree with him?  What impresses you the most?

Torrance Center at UGA

Dr. Bonnie Cramond at UGA is one of the leading professors and researchers in this field.  If you are interested in this field, you can check the Torrance Center at UGA.  Torrance Center help people to know whether they are creative or not and provide resources to teachers and parents to help creative children they have. We will invite a student of Dr. Cramond to talk about measuring creativity.

HOW CAN SCHOOL ENCOURAGE CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION?

Do you have any example about how your teachers encourage you to be creative?  What kind of things can you do to help students think creatively?  How can you boost students’ creativity?

There is a school in Hall County, GA is doing something special.  The school is called DaVinci Academy.  This is really a dream school for both students and teachers.  No principal.  Only 10 teachers and 240 students. The students don’t have textbooks and the teachers create their own curriculum…this made parents a little bit concerned and worried in their first year.  However, the test scores from their students proved that they can still achieve the goals and all the standards. They were having the museum exhibition about Africa and Egypt  a couple of years ago.  Students do the research, set up the exhibition, and explain everything to visitors all by themselves.   They try hard to tell people that creativity, critical thinking, and high motivation…etc, can still be emphasized in the current education system.

Creativity Cases

OUTSIDE OF CLASS

Access cases here

You’ll be developing a better understanding of the ways that technology tools can support creativity for learning. You will be working on two cases that asks you to be creative as a teacher.  If you would like to explore something on your own, you will have the option. You’ll have a chance to learn about podcasting, mobile treasure hunts, flipped classrooms, SMART Board and more. These are independent projects and each option has a written documentation piece to go along with it.

Each of the 2 cases you choose must be accompanied by written documentation (3-4 paragraphs, 200 words) that relates your project to the assigned readings (maker spaces, creativity definitions, Grow Creativity article.)  Review each case description for details of what should be included.

Make Creativity Cases page on your portfolio. Add a description of each case you are doing and add a link to your product along with written documentation.

Creativity Cases are due March 31, 2014 by 11:59 pm EDT.

 

MakerSpace

We’re going to learn about it by turning our classroom into a MakerSpace for the next several classess.  Let’s learn a bit more about Maker Spaces:

The idea of Maker Spaces aligns nicely with the NETS for Creativity and Innovation:

NESTS: Creativity and Innovation

Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.

Students:

a. apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
b. create original works as a means of personal or group expression.
c. use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues.
d. identify trends and forecast possibilities.

Discussion

So you read the “Creative Education” chapter on the National Advisory Committee on Creative and Cultural Education Report (pages 28-43). As an individual, you came up with a question that you want to discuss in class on this wall. 

Now as a group, we will do an activity.

1. Pick a question on the wall that you want to discuss with your group members.

2 . Discuss.

3. There is one more thing you will do.  I will let you know in class.

For Thursday:

1.Read Shively, C.H., (2011). Grow Creativity. Learning & Leading with Technology. 38 (7), pp. 10-15.  You can access the reading here. The article is in the May 2011 issue.

2. Read more about MakerSpaces. Click here to view the MakerSpace Playbook (pdf) Read Chapters 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, and 11 (they are really short, I promise).

3. We will have a guest speaker who will introduce us to a topic of how to measure creativity.

20% Blog and Creativity and Innovation

March 6, 2014 § Leave a comment

PART ONE: SMART Board

I hope you had an educational experience with the Educational Technology Center crew. I wanted to remind you a few take away points and further resources for you to use SMART Board in your areas.

a. Using your finger as the mouse.
Open your PPTs, your Web sites, whatever, then walk over to the SMART Board and simply interact with them there.

b. Using the Ink Layer to annotate or mark up the screen.
Pick up a pen to activate the Ink Layer. Think of it as a thin sheet of transparent film that has magically appeared and is covering the screen. Saving annotated or marked up pages is a good first use of the Notebook software.

c. Using SMART’s Notebook software to capture one or multiple pages of traditional whiteboard notes.
Imagine using a traditional whiteboard and wishing you could save the notes you or your group just took. And, just as one board fills up, imagine immediately having another whiteboard wheeled into the room for you to use. The SMART Notebook software gives you this ability.

d. Using SMART’s Notebook software to create presentations, lessons, and activities.
The SMART Notebook software is really a powerful authoring tool. Think of it as PowerPoint, but where individual objects can be manipulated while the presentation is running. Create activities and interactive multimedia by inserting text, graphics, photos, and video on as many slides (or pages) as you wish. Use the Notebook Gallery to access clip art and interactive ‘widgets’ (e.g. timers, games, and animated activities).

There are some activities sample in the Notebook software.  It is easier to edit these activities on your personal computer than on the real SMART Board.  It’s also easier to start making your teaching materials by using the templates in the Notebook software.  Therefore, try to play with some of the activities.  Or, you can go to SMART Exchange to see more examples and download some templates.

Here are some tutorial videos about using features in Smart Notebook.

  1. A 2-minute tutorial on using the Gallery in Notebook.
  2. 2-minute tutorial on Page Sorter in Notebook.
  3. A 2-minute tutorial on object animation in Notebook.

Or you can watch these tutorials made by the Smart company.

20% Project Expectations and Rubric

You reviewed your peers’ 20% blog. What are your take-aways? What was exemplary? What do you plan on doing on your blog that you learned from others’?

We will have an activity to build our expectation about blogging. Based on your input, I will make a draft of bingo rubric for our 20% project.  I want you to have an input on what should go in the rubric. So we’ll spend some time brainstorming what makes a good 20% project.

Add another posting to your 20% blog. This will be the third blog post unless you have more.

Having the suggestions by your peers, what would you do now? Spend some time looking for answers to your research question. Talk about where you searched for answers and what you are beginning to find. Go into more details about your topic.

 

Creativity and Innovation

 So..how to better design your blog?

We’re starting a new topic today – Creativity and Innovation.

WHAT ARE THE TRAITS OF CREATIVE PEOPLE?

Are you creative?  Are there any creative people in your life?  Do you think they share some common traits?

Some traits of creative people can be considered weird behavior.  As a teacher, do you think that you can tell who are creative kids in your class?  Do you think that you are prepared to help those creative kids?  Let’s watch this video of a creative girl.

HOW DO RESEARCHERS THINK ABOUT CREATIVITY?

Before we talk about creativity in today’s education, let’s learn from the researchers.  Dr. Bonnie Cramond at UGA is one of the leading professors and researchers in this field.  If you are interested in this field, you can check the Torrance Center at UGA.  Torrance Center help people to know whether they are creative or not and provide resources to teachers and parents to help creative children they have. We will invite a student of Dr. Cramond to talk about measuring creativity.

Sir Ken Robinson, a creativity expert from England, actually delivered a powerful talk in 2006 and indicated that schools kill creativity.  Let’s take a look at part of this video to see why he thinks that the school is killing creativity (1:00-6:30, 8:30-13:20).

Four years later, he was invited to give another TED talk about creativity.  He has some great ideas that is very helpful for educators.  Now let’s listen to his talk. (3:20 or 5:00-16:30)

Do you agree with him?  What impresses you the most?

HOW CAN SCHOOL ENCOURAGE CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION?

Do you have any example about how your teachers encourage you to be creative?  What kind of things can you do to help students think creatively?  How can you boost students’ creativity?

There is a school in Hall County, GA is doing something special in their school.  The school is called DaVinci Academy.  This is really a dream school for both students and teachers.  No principal.  Only 10 teachers and 240 students. The students don’t have textbooks and the teachers create their own curriculum…this made parents a little bit concerned and worried in their first year.  However, the test scores from their students proved that they can still achieve the goals and all the standards. They were having the museum exhibition about Africa and Egypt  a couple of years ago.  Students do the research, set up the exhibition, and explain everything to visitors all by themselves.   They try hard to tell people that creativity, critical thinking, and high motivation…etc, can still be emphasized in the current education system.

FOR TUESDAY March 18th:

1. Add a 3rd post to your blog – spend some time looking for answers to your research question. Talk about where you searched for answers and what you are beginning to find.

2. Connect with classmates via Twitter who are working on similar topics. Post a link on Twitter to your latest blog post – use your topic hashtag and #edit2000

3. Find at least 10 people on Twitter to follow that will help you with ideas for your project until our next class.  *Remember the 100/100 rule – at least 100 tweets and at least 100 people to follow before the end of the semester.

4. Read the “Creative Education” chapter on the National Advisory Committee on Creative and Cultural Education Report (pages 28-43). Prepare one question about the reading. We will pick your questions to discuss in class. Write your question in this wall.

5. Try something that you have never tried during Spring Break. It might be a new recipe or a new activity. Or it can be a new way to solve a problem that has been bothering you or your friends for a long time. Just be CREATIVE!

6. Heads-up: We will have a guest speaker to introduce us to a topic: “How to measure creativity” on Thursday, March 20th.

20% Peer Review & Suggestions

March 2, 2014 § Leave a comment

Hi EDIT2000,

You can see 20% Blog Peer Review and Suggestion Sign-up Sheet here.

In the sheet, you listed your driving question, about.me profile, and the two fellow students’ names that you will review their blog posts.

You will go to the two peers’ about.me profile and see who they are and go to their 20% blogs. There should be at least two postings (one for their driving questions, the other for their exploration of other similar topics). Leave comment for each posting of the person.  So in total, you will leave four comments.

In your comments, be sure to address three things.

  1. What did they do well?
  2. What else do you wish to see in their postings?
  3. What are some other websites, blogs, or readings they should look further?

Peer review and suggestions should be completed by Wednesday March 5, 2014, 11:59 pm.

If you have any questions about 20% blog peer review, leave them on Facebook or email me.