Showcase!

April 24, 2014 § Leave a comment

The rotation of today’s show case is as follow:

11: 15 AM -11:30 AM:  Groups A and B present

11:30-11:45: Groups B and C present

11:$5-12:00 Groups A and C present

 

Group A:

Askin, Jalecia
Brown, Kelly
Brown, Kelsey
Cardiello, joshua
Coyle, Ryan
Darden, Juliana
DeLoach, James

Group B:

DeVore, Brooke
Douglas, Michael
Falkenstein, Zoe
Jamison, Claire
Jolicoeur, Isabel
Lein, Matthew
LeMay,Uriah

Group C:

Malasarte, Megan
Roberts, Matthew
Robertson, Natalie
Towler, Henry
ventura, janyl
Warren, Shelby

Before the showcase!

April 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

Course Evaluation

Please complete the end-of-course evaluation.

Trajectory

  • Today, 4/22:
    • Problem Solving project presentation
    • Due: Problem solving and learning adventure project: 11:59pm
    • Notes and info for 20% project
  • Thursday, 4/24: Last day of class,
    • Due: 20% project showcase – Post your product to EDIT2000 Exhibition and link to your portfolio page before the showcase begins at 11:00 am
    • View 20% project Rubric.
    • Class picture: After the showcase is over, we will take a class picture!
  • Next Tuesday, 4/29:
    • 20%: project reflection 5th posting due (All you should have left to do after the showcase is your final reflection blog post for your 20% project.)
    • Link your product to your portfolio. Otherwise, I won’t grade.
    • Final reflection for the entire class.
  • Grades should be posted no later than May 2nd.

Remaining Tasks

The remaining assignments are due by Tuesday April 29, 11:59 pm.

  • Reflection on your 20% project: Write your final blog post on the following:
    • What did you learn from your 20% project? You probably learn a lot from this project, but try to summarize your learning experience into key points. Provide details, evidence, illustrations, facts, examples, models, etc. that support your learning.
    • What product did you make? Embed or link your product page on your final blog post to describe its connection to what you have learned through 20% project.
    •  What difficulties did you find on your 20% project?
    • After the showcase, how was your product received?
  • Final reflection on what you have learned in this course: Reread what you wrote about what you wanted to learn from the beginning of the semester on your homepage of your portfolio. Then, write an overview of what you have learned this semester and what you feel you have left to learn. Your final reflection should be at least 2 paragraphs (minimum 100 words)
  • Make sure all portions of your portfolio are completed.

Your Grade

I will distribute your individual grade report. This is the time to bring your concerns about your grade. Remaining projects are due by next Tuesday. Your final grade will be available.

 

20% Project Showcase

  • The showcase will be highly interactive environment. Visitors will stop by your station and you will show your product and talk about important points about your product.
  • We will start at 11:15 am so prepare your stations. Have a chair for your visitor.
  • We will divide the class in three groups and have two thrids of group present and one third of group and the guests will visit the stations. We will have three rotations. Each time will be 15 minutes.
  • We will end at 12 pm so that we have time for class picture.
  • Prepare your stations:
  • Have a laptop to display your presentation and invite visitors to navigate as you introduce.
  • Table Sign: Prepare your table sign. Download a template to add your project title, name, and your product QR code.
    • Email your completed file to me by Wednesday and I will print your sign for you in a thick colored paper. (leee@uga.edu)
    • To make a QR code, use QR code generator.
  • Have something inviting: cookies or candies or healthy snack, whatever that may represents your project
  • If you have a business card, do bring business card.
  • Dress for Success: So how about dress code?
    • I believe you know what a formal presentation should be like, right?
    • eveninggowns
    • dress code women what to wear in the office
    • anna_blog2
    • Male_dress_code_in_Western_culture
  • Any other question about the final presentation?

Problem Solving Presentation

You will be presenting your problem case, evidence, and a solution today. The goal is to communicate effectively to those who face the same problem (stakeholders) and receive their feedback on their opinion as to what to consider on implementing the solution.

You will have 5 minutes to present and 2 minutes for Q/A and feedback. Five minutes is not a long time to present your problem case and a solution. The key is to clearly explain and convince your audience that the problem you present is really pressing and your solution can be effective at reducing or eliminating the problem.

Each audience member will evaluate each team’s presentation and provide feedback on how to improve the solution. We will use ProblemSolvingPresentationPeerFeedbackForm.

 

The order of presentation is as follows:

  1. Ryan, Brooke and Juliana
  2. Shelby and Janyl
  3. Zoe, Natalie, and Claire
  4. Uriah and James
  5. Matt and Matt
  6. Megan and Isabel
  7. Josh & Brendan
  8. Jalecia

 

Problem Solving Reflection and Revision

After presentation, revise your solution as a group using the feedback you received from your classmates.

1. As a team: Add a revised solution slide to your Google presentation.

2. Individually: Embed your Google Presentation to your individual portfolio. Write a reflection in 200 words. This is due Wednesday by the beginning of the class.

Address all of the following in your reflection:

  • How did you approach identifying a problem? How did your group decide on the problem to focus?
  • What did you to understand about the problem?
  • What sources have you looked to find information about the problem? What evidence did you find that support the problem case?
  • How realistic is your solution? Would you give it to policymakers to implement your solution?
  • How did you revise your solution?
  • How did peer feedback help you?
  • Having gone through a problem solving process, what suggestions do you have for other teachers who were to employ problem-based learning in their classroom?

 

I look forward to your presentation this Thursday! Feel free to email, text, or FB me with questions.

 

 

 

Independent Work Day

April 17, 2014 § Leave a comment

Today  you do not have to come to class. The classroom is available for you to work with your group if you choose to come.

I would target to finish your learning adventure and problem solving project today, except the presentation, reflection, and revision of your problem solving project.

Problem Solving Project Clarifications

Here is a copy of clarifications about problem solving project that I emailed all of you:

________

Your group is working to identify one problem, and your evidence may come from multiple sources. Solutions may be one or more depending on your suggested solutions.  You can show evidence regarding why the problem is problem. For example, if you are working on the parking situations in downtown, you may provide evidence that there is limited space compared to demand according to Athens Banner Herald. You should also provide evidence for your suggested solution to prove that your solution is actually effective and plausible. For example, your solution is building a 10 story parking deck, you should provide the parking deck offers parking spaces matching the demand and the city will make a  return on investment by charging X amount of dollar.

Google Doc is for your group members to collect and share various thoughts and findings. This will show me how your group worked together to brainstorm your possible problems, amass evidence, and reach the agreement of the solutions.

The presentation of your problem solving project should last about 7-10 minutes. Your presentation should give a synopsis of the project. You can use the diagram depicted of the problem solving process as your outline: Problem identification/ definition, evidence, and solution. The following examples should give you some idea how to organize your presentations even though the concept map is not included in these presentations, your presentation should include your group’s concept map. The concept map shows the big picture of the relationships between the problem, evidence, and solution. The concept map only contain the keywords of each.

UGA Bus system: https://sites.google.com/site/katiesedit2000portfolio/problem-based-learing

UGA Dining Hall: https://sites.google.com/site/tessasresearch/problem-based-learning  (I requested the owner of this document to change the sharing setting so you can see it)

UGA Football Tickets: https://sites.google.com/site/emilysedit2000portfolio/problem-solving

Overall, it is an open-ended project. It requires your critical thinking skills to identify, evaluate, and select information for your chosen topic. However you present your problem solving process is up to you. I hope you have fun and learn.

_________

View the project description pages:

 

20% Project

A complete information about 20% project is found on the left menu bar of our blog.

20% project will be graded upon the following Rubric. This rubric is to give you an idea what is expected of blog postings, product, and presentation.

What to make for your product

We will explore some tools that may work well to present your findings for your 20% project. Many video tutorials are available on YouTube on how to use the listed tools for educational purposes. Go to YouTube and type the app name and explore some of the tutorials for inspirations and technical how-to.

Free website tools:

Here are some tools that let you create a website. They provide various templates that fits your needs.

Weebly.com:

Google Site

Blogging

Online poster: Organize multimedia in a meaningful way in one screen.

  • Glogster is a social site that lets users mash up music, photos, videos, and pretty much anything else you’d like. It’s a great way to create learning materials.
  • Digital Storytelling
  • Padlet: Leadership

Some other tools:

  • Gibbon.co: Compile readings and videos to teach on a topic and facilitate a discussion on the topic with your followers
  • Educreations–Create your video lessons
  • MOOKLET– create your own e-books (free)
  • Openzine – create an online magazine.
  • Scribd – free magazine creator site 
  • Smore – free newsletter creator

PART 2: Design your product

As you design your product, what do you need to consider? No matter what you are making, what are some essential things you need to convey?

Work with your group to help you design your product.

1. Each team member will present their driving question, target audience, and product ideas. Define the purpose of your product.

2. Brainstorm with your team members what your video should contain and what are some effective ways toeliver your message.

 

Define your site’s content areas

If you are making a website, think about the navigation structure and menus.  Should you have a particular flow visitors follows? Or can they go freely from one menu to the other?

Defining your content areas will help you to develop your navigational structure.
First, analyze the content you already have in your Blog and decide which pieces should be added to your website.Use only the content that will be useful to your users.
Next, list all of the content areas that your users will want to find on your site. The ideal way to do this is to ask a wide sampling of actual users (who are members of your target audiences) what they will be seeking. If you do not have access to actual users, ask your team members what they will want to find on your site. Once you’ve done this, you may need to set aside any user goals that are not practical to include in the scope of your project. Also, you may need to add items your key stakeholders want to include.

This Information Architecture guide gives you an in-depth idea about what to watch out for when you create a website.

In your 20% project blog, please add the URL to your finished product so that visitors can see the product.

For Tuesday:

Be prepared to give presentation about your problem solving project.

We will talk about how to present your 20% project. You will continue working on creating your product.

 

 

Critical Thinker’s Project

April 15, 2014 § Leave a comment

Housekeeping:

If you have not submitted what you are working on for Critical Thinkers Project, do it now.

Showcase Flyer: Download the showcase flyer and distribute! Invite your friends!

Tuesday, 4/15: Work on your critical thinkers project.
Thursday, 4/17: Independent workday – class will not meet
Monday, 4/21: Learning Adventure Project recommended due 11:59 pm

Tuesday, 4/22: Problem Solving project presentation/Problem solving and learning adventure project due 11:59pm/ Notes and info for 20% project
Thursday, 4/24: Last day of class, due, 20% project showcase – Post your product to EDIT2000 Exhibition.
Friday, 4/25: 20% project due (All you should have left to do after the showcase is your final reflection blog post for your 20% project.)

Tuesday, 4/29: Final reflection for the entire class. That’s it.

 

Let’s view the remaining stop animation videos on EDIT2000 Exhibition.

 

Let’s look at the NETS again.

Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. Students:

  1. identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  2. plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  3. collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  4. use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

Critical Thinking: Which website is telling the truth? How do you judge its accuracy and credibility?
Dihydrogen monoxide

The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus

 

 

Learning Adventure for Today

PART Four: Backwards design: Student Product

Sometimes the best way to figure out what you want to teach is to first figure out what you want students to be able to do. When you’re cooking, most of the time you decide what you want to eat BEFORE you get together your ingredients. At least, in the more successful times that you are cooking. So, let’s figure out what kinds of projects your students might complete – then we’ll working on organizing resources to help them create their projects. Just as we choose a recipe by looking at pictures, a lot of kids will choose your adventure based on the project they will complete.

Now it’s time to brainstorm project ideas. What kinds of projects might your student do? Will they create a glogster poster to show how they define a hero? Or will they create a video to talk about recycling? Maybe you’ll encourage your student to start a blog to help other middle schooler’s learn how to keep their personal hygiene. Here’s a long list of project ideas. Read about Twenty Ideas for Engaging Projects for more ideas.

Once you have a question and a project in mind, it’s time to figure out how you’re going to help students come up with an answer to your question and show you what they know (i.e. what they believe the answer is) with some type of project.

 

Part Five: Hook

By now you’ve come up with a topic, decided on a project for your students to complete, and have possibly come up with some engaging wording for your “Driving” or “Essential” or “Interesting” Question.  The next step is to collect resources that students can use to increase interest in the topic, to begin thinking about the question, and to begin gathering information to accomplish the task/create the project. This is the “Hook” section of the rubric for this assignment. You can review the rubric.

The hook or anticipatory set should be designed to focus the attention of your learners. It’s the part that hooks them into your topic. You’ll do some of this in your introductory video, too – but this “Hook” section should get them really into your topic.

Let’s look at some “hooks” from previous adventures and  Third Grade Health Adventure.

 

Part Six: Explore

Where can you go to find interactive games and resources to use in this section and the “Explore” section?  Thinkfinity  is an appropriate resource regardless of grade or subject area.

Author Information

***Make sure to put you and your partner’s name on the main page of your website. Also, include a picture of each of you – especially if you’re not all going to be on the introductory video.

 

PART Seven. Introduction video

As you know you need to create a video introducing yourself (and your partners) and your learning adventure. You can use Photo Booth if you are using Mac or you can use Flipgrid to record your introduction video. A movie trailer might be fun, too. Be creative.

You don’t want to be on the video? Here is a way to create an avatar to speak for you using GoAnimate.

PROBLEM SOLVING PROJECT for Today

 

Today we are continuing on solving one of the persistent yet urgent problems faced by UGA and Athens.

problemsolving

Your problem solving project will be graded according to this rubric.

Evidence Exploration

Once your group has identified and defined the problem, you would move onto thinking about how to solve the problem and learning about what you need to know.

You are working on a variety of problems so it is hard for me to give specific resources. Instead, I can give you some guidance on finding the resources that you may need.

  • What kind of resources would be most useful?
  • Where should we look at to find resources on the topic?
  • What are some search keywords?
  • What does statistics say about the frequency or the serious of the problem?

Some places to look for information about universities and lives in America

US Census Bureau

Athens Clarke County Office

Red & Black

Once you locate some resources, examine it carefully.

  • How do you know if this information is correct and current?
  • Who is the author of this site and what credentials support his or her authority on the topic?
  • Are there other Web sites or resources that contain the same information?
  • What does a non-Web source say about the information found from the Web?
  • When was the site last updated?
  • How much of the site is primary source material?

It is helpful to use mind maps (concept maps) to organize evidence in relation to solutions. There are many Web 2.o collaborative mind tools. I like to use Mindomo. If you would like to use this tool, it is better to choose the “mind mapping and project collaboration” option. Sign up and start using with your group members.

Solution Assembly

Brainstorming

The first step for finding a solution to your problem is brainstorming. Your group members may have different ideas. Discuss and fill out this template. The key here is not to judge the solutions. List them as they are brought in without any prejudice.

Weighing alternatives

Once you have different ideas for solution, The Developing and Weighing alternatives page can guide weigh different options for your final solution. This page suggest you to make a grid of alternative solutions.  Draw grid on the back of the brainstorming page.

Solution justification

Once you have come up with a possible solution, be prepared to explain the following questions in your presentation.

  • Can you explain why you selected this solution?
  • What evidence have you found to support your solution?
  • How does your evidence support your solution?

 

For Thursday:

Although we are not meeting on Thursday, I will post an update to the blog with information about completing the remaining sections of the Learning Adventure and Problem Solving Project.

You are expected to complete your learning adventure and problem solving projects by Tuesday.  At the same time, work on your 20% project product. If you have not started on it, you would want to do it before next Tuesday.

Problem-based learning and Project-based learning

April 10, 2014 § Leave a comment

Housekeeping: Here’s a brief overview of the topics we will be covering during the remainder of our classes:

Today 4/10: Problem-based learning and project-based learning. Begin your critical thinker’s project (This is what I will call both the problem solving project and the learning adventure)

Tuesday, 4/15: Work on your critical thinkers project.
Thursday, 4/17: Independent workday – class will not meet
Monday, 4/21: Learning Adventure Project recommended due 11:59 pm

Tuesday, 4/22: Problem Solving project presentation/Problem solving and learning adventure project due 11:59pm/ Notes and info for 20% project
Thursday, 4/24: Last day of class, due, 20% project showcase
Friday, 4/25: 20% project due (All you should have left to do after the showcase is your final reflection blog post for your 20% project.)

Tuesday, 4/29: Final reflection for the entire class. That’s it.

 

 

Reminders: Remember 100 tweets/ 100 following?

Reminders: You should be working on your 20% project product. Be ready for the showcase!

 

PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING AND PROJECT-BASED LEARNING

I believe most of us won’t like to learn something that is not applicable in our daily life, right? I remember I always asked myself the same question when I was learning advanced mathematics in high school. For example, calculating the probability. Do I need to know what the probability of taking a green ball out of the bag while there are 2 green balls mixed with 3 red balls and 2 yellow balls? Therefore, we try to make everything more relevant and applicable.

That is the problem-based learning. We try to solve the real-world/ authentic problems. You see a lot of problem-based learning in architecture education, engineering, business education and medical education.

In the following video, you will see how a teacher conduct problem-based learning in her classroom.

What are some key activities taking place while students are engaged in problem-based learning?

A lot of problem-based learning is strongly connected with project-based learning. Project-based learning does not need to tackle with a real-world problem. At the same time, students are usually more involved or have much more control in the project.

Let’s watch this video about project-based learning.

 

Together, we’ll watch the video on Applying Math Skills to a Real-World Problem.  What evidence do you see that this is a good project? What are the characteristics of a good project-based learning activity?

Write down some key activities that are included in the project-based learning.

So, can you describe project-based learning? Does it sound familiar?  Many of the projects we do in this course are designed for project-based learning. 20% project? Yes, definitely.

THE NETS STANDARD FOR PROBLEM SOLVING, CRITICAL THINKING, AND DECISION MAKING

Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

Students:

  1. identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  2. plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  3. collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  4. use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

In the textbook we used before, they defined problem solving ability this way.

“Students apply critical and creative thinking skills to prior knowledge during the problem solving process. The end result of problem solving is typically some kind of a decision: choosing a solution and then evaluating it.” (p 155)

“Problem-based learning (PBL) is a teaching approach that combines critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and inquiry as students explore real-world problems. It is based on unstructured, complex, and authentic problems that are often presented as part of a project.” (p 156)

Here is a very nice infographic about project-based learning. Hope this can be a very good reference for your own design.

 

 

Learning Adventure or Problem Solving?

Depending on what you have decided to work on, you will spend the rest of the class to start off the first step.

SUBMIT:  Let me know what you are working on for Critical Thinkers Project by submitting this form.

Problem Solving Project

The problem solving process usually goes like this.

problemsolving

Problem identification

Today, you will work on identifying a problem. What do you see as the most annoying, pressing problem at UGA? What have bothered you the most living in Athens?

Here is an example of a problem at UGA.

On a typical game day at the University of Georgia, 90 tons of trash are generated after the football game. This massive amount of disposed items require 1000 collective hours of cleaning up by 100 personnel and $100, 000 per game. There are 10 home games per season. The materials wasted on a game day not only cost money but also cause a serious yet avoidable waste of resources and energy. This waste becomes a serious financial and environmental burden for the University. The University of Georgia turns to EDIT2000 students to suggest a solution to reduce monetary and environmental costs by 50%. What solutions would you recommend for the University? Your solutions should be accompanied by convincing evidence and a detailed, realistic plan of action.

Note that the problem as presented as a case. You are already familiar with cases that we worked on creativity cases.  Usually, a case is written in present tense, short in length, compelling, and appropriate for the reader’s age level to arouse interest and empathy (Herreid, 1997). The case clearly illustrates the dilemma without resolving it.

So, today, your group’s job is to identify a problem.  You may use a think, share, and decide activity.

Think of a problem you encounter at UGA or in Athens. What do you see as the most annoying, pressing problem at UGA? What have bothered you the most living in Athens?

1. Think: Write down your idea individually on a piece of paper.

2. Share: Tell your team members about what problems you identified.

3. Decide: Pick one of the problems suggested by your team members. As a group, describe the problem as a case to solve.

Problem Definition

Your group has identified the problem and turned it into a case. Now, let’s look more closely at the problem. What else do you need to know to better understand about the problem and eventually suggest a solution? Without understanding clearly about the problem, you may not be able to devise a realistic, effective solution.  This Website can help your approach to problem definition. Think of the following to define your problem.

Consider these questions:

  • What is the problem?
  • Is it my problem?
  • Can I solve it? Is it worth solving?
  • Is this the real problem, or merely a symptom of a larger one?
  • If this is an old problem, what’s wrong with the previous solution?
  • Does it need an immediate solution, or can it wait?
  • Is it likely to go away by itself?
  • Can I risk ignoring it?
  • Does the problem have ethical dimensions?
  • What conditions must the solution satisfy?
  • Will the solution affect something that must remain unchanged?

Causes!

When problem solving, identify the causes of the problem in order to solve it.

  • Identify causes of your problem
    Look at the current situation, rather than its history
    Do not consider the “trouble” it creates whether now or in the future.
  • List and organize the causes of the problem

 

How to submit

Within your group, use a Google Doc to organize your problem solving flow and write collaboratively with your group members.  Be sure to invite me (eunbae.lee@gmail.com) as a collaborator to your shared document.

 

Learning Adventure

PART ONE: Adventure Project Requirements

Review the rubric. This form will also serve as a guide to how you might pace your work so that it can be completed by the due date.

 

PART TWO: What is an essential question?

You’ll want to get students interested in your topic by starting with an essential question. We’re going to try and write a few ourselves today.

  1. On an index card, write a question related to a topic about which you enjoy learning. For example, “what happened to the dinosaurs?”, “why did the Titanic sink”, etc.
  2. Get in a group with 3 other classmates, and use a tubric to turn your question into an essential question.
  3. How good is your question? Use the essential question development checklist on the last page of this handout to see how well you did.
  4. Wonderopolis is a great place to get information and ideas for your adventures.

 

PART THREE: Getting Started

For the remainder of today’s class, you’ll want to work with your partner (if you have one) to come up with ideas for your essential question.

You’ll also want to create a new Google site (not a new page in your current site) and do the following:

o   Make sure the title of your site reflects the nature of your adventure.

o   Share permissions within your site with your partner (if you have one). You will want to make sure both of you can make edits. Here’s a video to help you choose the correct settings.

o   Make sure your navigation bar reflects the sections in the rubric distributed in class today.

 

PART Four: Backwards design: Student Product

Sometimes the best way to figure out what you want to teach is to first figure out what you want students to be able to do. When you’re cooking, most of the time you decide what you want to eat BEFORE you get together your ingredients. At least, in the more successful times that you are cooking. So, let’s figure out what kinds of projects your students might complete – then we’ll working on organizing resources to help them create their projects. Just as we choose a recipe by looking at pictures, a lot of kids will choose your adventure based on the project they will complete.

Now it’s time to brainstorm project ideas. What kinds of projects might your student do? Will they create a glogster poster to show how they define a hero? Or will they create a video to talk about recycling? Maybe you’ll encourage your student to start a blog to help other middle schooler’s learn how to keep their personal hygiene. Here’s a long list of project ideas. Read about Twenty Ideas for Engaging Projects for more ideas.

Once you have a question and a project in mind, it’s time to figure out how you’re going to help students come up with an answer to your question and show you what they know (i.e. what they believe the answer is) with some type of project.

 

For Next Class:

  • These two projects are quite large and you will need to pace yourself. It is highly recommended that you complete what we covered today before you come back on Tuesday. We will do a whole lot more on Tuesday.
  • Read this Scholastic article about project-based learning.

Problem Solving and Critical Thinking

April 8, 2014 § Leave a comment

CRITICAL THINKING AND PROBLEM SOLVING

All roads lead to Rome.  There are always several ways for us to solve a problem.  It’s important to help your students develop the critical thinking and problem solving abilities.  I read an article talking about the “Pampered Child Syndrome.”  Any of you get the idea what that means?

Due to this syndrome, more and more children lose the abilities to solve the problems they encounter in their daily life.  As educators, we do need to challenge ourselves first.  You all did a good job in trying something new for the stop animation infomercial project.  For the rest of this semester, I am going to push you all more to walk out of your comfort zone.  I think that is a good way to learn, right? So let’s spend a few classes talk about several important topics in the 21st century learning– critical thinking and problem solving.  These two will lead us to another two topics– problem-based learning and project-based learning.   But first of all, let’s challenge ourselves a little bit.

PART One: Marshmallow CHALLENGE

We need 3-4 people in the table. Your team’s challenge is to build the tallest freestanding structure with spaghetti and a marshmallow. You will have ingredients of 20 spaghetti strips, 1 yard of string, marshmallow, 1 yard of masking tape.

Here is a direction:

  1. Build the Tallest Freestanding Structure: The winning team is the one that has the tallest structure measured from the table top surface to the top of the marshmallow. That means the structure cannot be suspended from a higher structure, like a chair, ceiling or chandelier.
  2. ✦The Entire Marshmallow Must be on Top: The entire marshmallow needs to be on the top of the structure. Cutting or eating part of the marshmallow disqualifies the team.
  3. ✦Use as Much or as Little of the Kit: The team can use as many or as few of the 20 spaghetti sticks, as much or as little of the string or tape. The team cannot use the paper bag as part of their structure.
  4. ✦Break up the Spaghetti, String or Tape: Teams are free to break the spaghetti, cut up the tape and string to create new structures.
  5. ✦The Challenge Lasts 18 minutes: Teams cannot hold on to the structure when the time runs out. Those touching or supporting the structure at the end of the exercise will be disqualified.
  6. ✦Do you understand the rules?  Ok, this will be fun.

 

PART TWO: Problem solving group discussion

Within your group – respond to one of the following questions:

  1. There are 2 types of problems: open-ended and close-ended. Which was the marshmallow challenge?
  2. How is the marshmallow challenge an inquiry activity?
  3. Could  the marshmallow challengebe considered problem-based learning?
  4. When have you experienced the problem-based learning approach in your classes? (What is problem-based learning?)
  5. How is this connected to critical thinking? For that matter, what IS critical thinking?

 

WHAT IS CRITICAL THINKING ANYWAY?

Critical thinking is a hot topic in the 21st century learning, but it is not a new idea at all.  Researchers have been working on this topic for more than 2500 years!  Let’s see how it is defined according to the experts.

Here is an interesting video to tell you about critical thinking– Critical Thinking Explained.

Have you thought about that?  You are thinking critically and solving problems every day!

 

THE NETS STANDARD FOR PROBLEM SOLVING, CRITICAL THINKING, AND DECISION MAKING

Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. Students:

  1. identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  2. plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  3. collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  4. use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

In the textbook we used before, they defined problem solving ability this way.

“Students apply critical and creative thinking skills to prior knowledge during the problem solving process. The end result of problem solving is typically some kind of a decision: choosing a solution and then evaluating it.” (p 155)

“Problem-based learning (PBL) is a teaching approach that combines critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and inquiry as students explore real-world problems. It is based on unstructured, complex, and authentic problems that are often presented as part of a project.” (p 156)

 

PART THREE: Learning Adventure Project (15%)

Today we are starting a new project, learning adventure. We will work on it for the next four classes. You have all created lesson plans, digital stories, a personal website, and more. Now it’s time to integrate all of your skills into one project.

RUBRIC: Here is the learning adventure project rubric.

One way I will suggest to all of you for this design is— Don’t follow the order of the rubric.  Think about the idea of BACKWARD DESIGN. We do it all the time.  Think about cooking.  Do you go buy everything and start to think about what you want to cook?  No!  You have the recipe in mind first and then go buy what you need to cook.  You have the products in your mind first.  So try to think about what you want your students to learn first!  And then think about how you are going to make learning happen!!

EXAMPLES

Before we get to all the details, let’s first look at some examples of Adventures created by former EDIT 2000 students. You are basically creating a web site for students, parents, and teachers. The site is meant to guide a student through an adventure of your choosing (of course, it’s nice to offer them choices within your adventure as well).

Adventures Down Under– An exploration of Australia

Purposeful Poetry

Go Green in 2014

Dream Vacation

What Makes A Healthy Student?

RESOURCES:

Here are some resources for you to think about your project.

  1. Tubric– If you want to use one of the Tubric to help you and your teammates to make your ideas into a good essential question, feel free to grab one.  But please return it to me before you go!
  2. Assessment Tool– This website is about assessment.  How can you assess your students?  If you do have trouble in thinking about something interesting to work on, start thinking about what kind of assessment you want to have for your learners.  Then maybe that will help you think about some good essential questions.
  3. Project-based Learning Database by BIE– You can search for projects.  This website is completely about PBL.  They have more hundreds of projects.  If you can’t come up with a good essential question, maybe you will find one from these projects.  Then you can design your own content.
  4. 20 Ideas for Engaging Projects–  Here are 20 ideas for PBL.  Maybe you can find a good one here.

 

Questions/Ideas

After looking at the student examples, what questions do you have? How do you think the adventure could have been improved? Do you notice any missing elements of the adventure that could have made it better? Think on this – maybe as we work through the project, you will want to go about it differently. That’s okay! Just be sure to talk with me to let me know your ideas.

Individual OR Partners

You can work alone or with a partner for this project. I am open to people working alone, but you need to be forewarned that this can be a lot of work – being able to share the work load will help you stay on target.

 

FOR THURSDAY:

1. Think about who you would like to work with and some possible topics for your project.

 

Finishing Up Creativity

April 3, 2014 § Leave a comment

Today we are wrapping up creativity and innovation.

Remember, according to the National Educational Technology Standards (NETS), educators should create opportunities for:

NETS for Students: Creativity and Innovation

Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.

Students:

a. apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
b. create original works as a means of personal or group expression.
c. use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues.
d. identify trends and forecast possibilities.

 

Before we go on, any questions about creativity cases? Creativity cases are due just now at the beginning of the class.

 

What is Plagiarism?

According to UGA’s “A Culture of Honesty“, plagiarism is defined as ”submission for academic advancement the words, ideas, opinions or theories of another that are not common knowledge, without appropriate attribution to that other person.” This is same as STEALING other’s property.

If you take other’s work (plagiarism), it is unethical (of course!) but also most times you end up breaking copyright law, which means it is illegal.

What is copyright law?

A form of protection to the authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works” (US Copyright Office, 2012).

With the advent of the Internet, people can easily access and copy others’ works without knowing if they are protected by copyright. However, most Web content is copyrightedThus, if you use the Web content without proper citation or attribution, you are committing plagiarism and violating the law. To use any copyrighted media such as images, music, and videos, you need to get a permission from the creator.

Teachers should be clearly aware of copyright so that they do not break the law when designing their class and looking for web resources for their class. Also, it is very IMPORTANT for teachers to teach students this as one of the 21st century skills. If you want to know more about copyright, you may want to read this article (only 2 pages and it should worth it!).

Why do you think these concerns are especially important in the 21st century?  Let’s watch the two videos.

Digital Citizenship in the 21st Century

 

Creative Commons

 

Creative Commons Images
Flikr is a good place to search for creative commons images.
Google Images also let you search for copyright free images.

Then, how would you cite a photo from the web? You need to provide the following information:

  • The creator/author
  • The title
  • The URL where the work is hosted (if available)
  • The type of license

Here are some more resources related to this topic.

A Fair(y) Use Tale: A witty video on YouTube that shows the extreme of fair use using Disney movies fairly.

Creative Commons: How to license your work and find resources that you can use with permission

Google Advance Image Search: Where you can find images to use with permission

Turnitin.com: Where you can find whether you break the rule of plagiarism

Plagiarism.net:  Similar to Turnitin, but free

We will spend some time discussing what is ahead for your 20% project and catch up on stop animation projects and watch the finished stop animations.

 

PART THREE: 20% Project

4th blog posting is due by next Monday, April 7, 11:59 pm. In the fourth blog posting, you may discuss the following:

Progress check

  • What have you learned so far and how are you documenting what you’ve learned?
  • What else do you need to know more about?
  • What else would you like to do to learn about the topic?
  • How does your project relate with what we are talking about in class?

Target audience

  • Who will benefit from what you learn through your 20% project?
  • With whom would you like to share what you learn through your 20% project?
  • What are their characteristics?
  • What should you consider about their characteristics to effectively share the information?

Product

  • What are some effective way to communicate your findings with your target audience?
  • What mode of delivery will best represent your findings? Is it an informative website (Weebly.com)? Online poster (Gloster.com, padlet.com) , storytelling (Storybird.com), a video, or a Facebook group?
  • What does your product should look like?
  • What information should it contain? How will you deliver the information?

 

Presentation tools for making your product

We will explore some tools that may work well to present your findings for your 20% project. Many video tutorials are available on YouTube on how to use the listed tools for educational purposes. Go to YouTube and type the app name and explore some of the tutorials for inspirations and technical how-to.

Free website tools:

Here are some tools that let you create a website. They provide various templates that fits your needs.

Weebly.com:

Google Site

Blogging

Online poster

Organize multimedia in a meaningful way in one screen.

  • Glogster is a social site that lets users mash up music, photos, videos, and pretty much anything else you’d like. It’s a great way to create learning materials.
  • Digital Storytelling
  • Padlet: Leadership

Some other tools:

  • Gibbon.co: Compile readings and videos to teach on a topic and facilitate a discussion on the topic with your followers
  • Educreations–Create your video lessons
  • MOOKLET– create your own e-books (free)
  • Openzine – create an online magazine.
  • Scribd – free magazine creator site 
  • Smore – free newsletter creator

Note that this is the blog that will help you plan for your product and presentation. Please review the rubric for blog posting, product, and presentation.  The fifth and last blog posting will be due at the end of the course after the presentation reflecting on your product development and presentation.

 

PART THREe: Individual consultations

You will have some time working on your various projects: 20% projects, finishing up your stop animation, or finetuning your creativity cases. I will be available for individual consultations.

Talk among our group what you are doing for your cases and 20% projects. It is always good to share what you are doing and bounce ideas off of each other.

 PART Four: Stop Animation Red Carpet Premiere

Be sure to upload your video on our Facebook Exhibition page.

In your interview with the reporter on the red carpet, please briefly tell us about:

  • what is your topic?
  • why did you want to do this?
  • one big difficulty of this project
  • one good thing about the project

 

FOR Next Class:

1. We begin critical thinking and problem solving next week.

2. Your 4th 20% Project blog post is due by 11:59 pm on Monday.

Once you complete your 4th blog posting,  please complete this form to let me know where you stand.

Where Am I?

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